Hoki

Maori name: Hoki
Scientific name: Macruronus novaezelandiae
Availability: Caught year-round. Main season June to September, particularly off the West Coast.
Weight: 0.5–3.5kg
Length: 60–100cm

Hoki

Maori name: Hoki
Scientific name: Macruronus novaezelandiae
Availability: Caught year-round. Main season June to September, particularly off the West Coast.
Weight: 0.5–3.5kg
Length: 60–100cm
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Location

They generally live beyond the shelf edge and are most abundant between 300 to 600 metres. Adult fish have been found at depths from 50 metres down to 900 metres. The juveniles often live in shallower water, where growth is rapid. Adults are between five and 20 years old.

Attributes

Dark purple-blue along the back, shading to paler iridescent blue on the upper side and mirror-like silver below. The fins are dark grey. Hoki have an easily recognisable long, thin body with a tapering tail fringed by dorsal and anal fins. The eyes and jaws are large. The teeth small and sharp.

Family

Hoki belong to the Merlucciidae family (hakes).

Spawning

Major winter spawning grounds include off the west coast of the South Island, particularly in the Hokitika Canyon, and in Cook Strait. Hoki are also found off the coast of South Australia and a related species, Macruronus magellenicus, is found off South America.

Sustainability

New Zealand hoki is considered one of the best managed trawl fisheries in the world, certified as sustainable by the Marine Stewardship Council  (MSC), the global gold standard for sustainability, in March 2001, recertified in October 2007 and again in August 2012. The hoki fishery was initiated in the early 1970s. In 1977 the catch reached 100,000 tonnes, dropping significantly the following year when the Exclusive Economic Zone was declared and catch limits introduced. Hoki was introduced into the Quota Management System in 1986 with a total allowable commercial catch of 250,000 tonnes, although catches did not reach this level until the late 1990s. The two biological stocks of hoki are subject to extensive scientific monitoring, with up to 3 research surveys completed every year and an annual stock assessment. Both stocks are currently assessed as being at or above target levels, and catch limits have been increased as a result.

Fishing methods

They are one of New Zealand's most important commercial deepwater species. Hoki are caught by trawling all around New Zealand, and are most common off the South Island on the Chatham Rise, Campbell Plateau and in Cook Strait.

Nutrition

Hoki is a good source

To quality for a 'good source' claim the food must contain at least 25% of the RDI.
The Recommended Dietary Intake (RDI) is considered to be the average daily dietary intake level that is sufficient to meet the nutrient requirements of nearly all (97–98 per cent) healthy individuals in a particular life stage and gender group.

of Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 is necessary for normal neurological function and it contributes to blood formation, energy metabolism and to the growth and development in children

, Vitamin D

Vitamin D is necessary for normal bone structure and the utilisation of calcium and phosphorus and it contributes to the maintenance of normal teeth

and Selenium

Selenium is necessary for normal immune system function and for the production of thyroid hormones and it contributes to the maintenance of hair and nails

; and a source

To quality for a 'source' claim the food must contain at least 10% of the RDI.
The Recommended Dietary Intake (RDI) is considered to be the average daily dietary intake level that is sufficient to meet the nutrient requirements of nearly all (97–98 per cent) healthy individuals in a particular life stage and gender group.

of Potassium

Potassium is necessary for water and electrolyte balance, it contributes to the functioning of the nervous system and normal muscle function; and to the normal growth and development of children

, Iodine

Iodine is necessary for the production of thyroid hormones, for normal neurological function and for normal energy metabolism, and it contributes to the growth and development in children

, Phosphorus

Phosphorus is necessary for normal teeth, bone and cell membrane structure and for energy metabolism

and Niacin (vitamin B3)

Niacin (vitamin B3) is necessary for the release of energy from food and for the normal structure and function of skin and mucous membranes, and contributes to the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

.

Seafood is a highly nutritious food and is a great source of protein

Protein is necessary for tissue building and repair, normal growth and development of bone in children and adolescents aged 4 years and over, and contributes to growth and maintenance of muscle mass

. Many species are low in saturated fat and a number of them are a good source of Omega 3

Omega 3 is a group of fatty acids that contribute to heart health

.

Tips

Hoki has delicate white flesh and is suitable for most methods of cooking (except pan frying crumbed or battered hoki) as the fillet flakes easily. Fresh fillets are ideally suited for use in fish cakes, a fish pie, curry or chowder. Frozen hoki is a convenient option to consider.

Buying & Storage Tips

When buying whole hoki, always check the...
EYES: Bright and clear cornea, shiny black pupil
GILLS: Rosy pink pastel coloured gills
SKIN: Bright, silver with a luminous sheen

When buying hoki fillets, always check the...
FLESH: semi-transparent and glossy

If the fish looks sticky or mushy then it is not fresh.