Skip to main content

Industry condemns skipper’s actions

Tuesday 4 October 2016

“Industry is very disappointed in this skipper’s actions that were totally out of line. We support the Ministry for Primary Industries in the action they have taken against him,” says Chief Executive Tim Pankhurst.

“There is no excuse for his behaviour. He was required to use a tori line, a device using streamers to scare off birds.

“We are committed to ensuring that fishing does its part to prevent seabird capture and have introduced a raft of measures to protect seabirds.

“We support the National Plan of Action for seabirds, a collaborative effort involving government, NGOs and industry that has resulted in mitigating seabird capture.

“We also support and fund the Southern Seabird Solutions Trust, which works with fishermen to reduce the harm to seabirds through fishing. 

“Industry is continually looking for innovative ways to mitigate risk to seabirds. For example, industry recently participated in a DOC project to improve tori line materials and performance on small coastal longliners – these improvements will be taken up in the coming year,” Tim Pankhurst says.

For more information about industry initiatives to reduce harm to seabirds go to the latest issue of Seafood magazine (pages 26-30).

Latest Media Releases

Seafood Innovations welcomes new General Manager

Monday 5 November 2018

Seafood Innovations Ltd (SIL), the body charged with providing research investment for the New Zealand seafood sector is welcoming a new General Manager.

New Zealand hoki quota owners proactively choosing to reduce catch

Wednesday 26 September 2018

Quota owners in the New Zealand hoki fishing industry have announced today they have proactively chosen to reduce the amount of hoki they will catch next year, in response to changing patterns they are observing in one of the five hoki fishing...

Tarakihi catch reduction supported

Wednesday 19 September 2018

Fisheries Inshore New Zealand (FINZ) is supportive of the announcement today that tarakihi catch on the east coast will be reduced by 20 percent while the commercial fishing industry works on a plan to rebuild the stock.